Blog Archives

Build Your Own Camera and Explore the Science and Engineering of Photography

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As the number of gadgets and gizmos available for purchase grows, there is a decreasing number of opportunities for kids to build their own toys. It’s not only a matter of convenience; it’s become increasingly difficult for do-it-yourself projects to compete with cheap mass-produced products that incorporate fancy electronics. We’ve featured DIY resources and social networks in the past, but most of the instructions on these sites won’t help you build anything too fancy. Now, with the Bigshot that changes.

The project helps you build your own digital camera using a kit they provide, while exposing you to the science and engineering of photography. The accompanying site is extremely well-designed and is filled with educational materials covering everything from the camera construction process to the science of optics. Of course, the allure of building and owning your own digital camera is undeniable, and for $89 is worth exploring if you run a science club or simply want to excite the child engineers in your life.

A Simple Animated Explanation of Free Falling and Zero Gravity

As children we first learn about the notion of weightlessness in outer space and the idea of zero gravity, but these concepts are actually a bit more nuanced than may appear. For example, why satellites orbit Earth instead of crashing into it because of Earth’s gravitational pull can be a mystery if you have never studied physics. The following TED Education animation does a good job of illustrating the basic principle behind orbiting objects without going into too many details.

If you’ve been exposed to high school physics, the Wikipedia article on weightlessness is uncharacteristically clear on some of the more advanced aspects of the subject. In particular, you may be surprised to learn that Einstein in developing his theory of relativity realized that gravitational interaction cannot be felt when all other forces are removed and this led him to consider the possibility that gravity is the result of the curvature of space. If you’re interested in the details of relativity and a modern interpretation of Newtonian mechanics, Leonard Susskind’s set of physics lectures is the best place to start.

12 Elementary Math Problems that Capture the Essence of Mathematical Thinking

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One of the most abused terms in mathematics education is problem solving. The term has been hijacked to mean anything from plugging numbers into the quadratic formula to repeating the same steps over and over again when calculating a derivative in calculus class. Neither of these activities could be further from the work of real mathematics, but what kind of problem solving constitutes true mathematical thinking? Alexandre Borovik and Tony Gardiner, both practicing mathematicians, provide a compelling answer in their paper: A Dozen Problems. These twelve problems are accessible even to elementary school students, yet they convey the archetypal paradigms of genuine mathematical thinking. The problems don’t require much mathematical background, certainly nothing beyond the regular school curriculum, but some of them require a good deal of mathematical sophistication. Most of these problems are part of the classical canon of math problems in Russian math literature and have been used in thousands of extracurricular math programs in Russia and the former Soviet Union. This paper is a good starting point if you’re interested in expanding your mathematical horizons beyond the regular school curriculum but are intimidated by difficult olympiad problems that require extensive extracurricular math knowledge.

(Photo credit: Kathy Cassidy)