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A Video Game Company Recruits, Trains, and Reaches Out to High School Students

The desire to create their own video games is one of the top reasons why kids give programming a try. As a result, teaching programming through computer game creation has become increasingly popular. One can now easily find books and after school programs that follow this trend, but as tempting as this approach may be, it suffers from false expectations. A student who wants to learn how to make video games doesn’t realize that computer science educators are more interested in teaching him how to program than in helping him create something that resembles the slick professionally-produced games that he plays at home. Of course, the initial excitement of creating your own computer program may compensate for unmet expectations, but it’s not clear that this is a good trend.

What if, on the other hand, students could create real modern video games alongside industry professionals? That is the idea behind Pipeline, an outreach effort by Valve, a major video game company. They have recruited a group of high school students who are working alongside their much older colleagues on video game titles that will be sold to millions of players around the world. These students are not only exposed to the video game industry, but are sharing their experience with their peers through the Pipeline website. This may be the easiest way to learn about what it actually takes to make a professional video game. Learning to code is important no matter what your goals are, but if you’re interested in joining the video game industry, signing up for Pipeline will give you a realistic view of the work and knowledge required to do so.

K-12 Science and Engineering Workshops at MIT

Edgerton outreach logo

One problem that online learning, with all of its obvious advantages, cannot currently solve is how to bring hands-on learning to students. Luckily, quite a few colleges and universities offer out of school STEM programs that complement videos and textbooks, and MIT is no exception. If you’re anywhere near the Greater Boston area you can schedule a free group workshop at the Edgerton Center at MIT, which runs a variety of science and engineering programs for kids of all ages. The activities, which are run by MIT undergraduate and graduate students, include working with electrical circuitry and exploring chemical reactions. For those who want more time to learn and build, longer summer programs are available, but you need to sign up early as they are quite popular. Below is a video that captures some of the spirit of the Edgerton Center.